Overheard in the newsroom

Editor 1: Do you think “Rainbow milestone reached” is an offensive headline for the story about the LGBT center creating an alumni organization?

Editor 2: Hmmm… It could be. Maybe we should change it just in case.

Layout Editor: Haven’t you guys made enough people angry this week?

Editor 1: …Yeah, that’s a good point.

I did this radio show and the deejay asks me, ‘What if you woke up tomorrow and you were beautiful?’
What do you mean ‘what if’?
He said, ‘What if you woke up and you were blonde and you had blue eyes and you were 5’11 and you weighed 100 pounds and you were beautiful? What would you do?’
And I said, ‘Well, I probably wouldn’t get up ‘cause I’d be too weak to stand.’
And I felt very sorry for him, ‘cause if that’s the only kind if person that you think is beautiful, you must not see very much beauty in the world.
And I think everybody is beautiful. And if you don’t think that I am beautiful, you are missing out. Because I am so beautiful.

Margaret Cho: Beautiful (via justanothersinger)

I want this tattooed on the inside of everyone’s eyelids.

(via aka14kgold)

I woulda smoove cussed his ass out on air.

That’s so fucked up

(via tashabilities)

(Reblogged from becauseiamawoman)

Teachers are often unaware of the gender distribution of talk in their classrooms. They usually consider that they give equal amounts of attention to girls and boys, and it is only when they make a tape recording that they realize that boys are dominating the interactions. Dale Spender, an Australian feminist who has been a strong advocate of female rights in this area, noted that teachers who tried to restore the balance by deliberately ‘favouring’ the girls were astounded to find that despite their efforts they continued to devote more time to the boys in their classrooms. Another study reported that a male science teacher who managed to create an atmosphere in which girls and boys contributed more equally to discussion felt that he was devoting 90 per cent of his attention to the girls. And so did his male pupils. They complained vociferously that the girls were getting too much talking time.

In other public contexts, too, such as seminars and debates, when women and men are deliberately given an equal amount of the highly valued talking time, there is often a perception that they are getting more than their fair share. Dale Spender explains this as follows:

“The talkativeness of women has been gauged in comparison not with men but with silence. Women have not been judged on the grounds of whether they talk more than men, but of whether they talk more than silent women.”

In other words, if women talk at all, this may be perceived as ‘too much’ by men who expect them to provide a silent, decorative background in many social contexts.

(Reblogged from theashleyclements)

tastefullyoffensive:

[thedauisrising]

This is absolutely something my father would do.

(Reblogged from tastefullyoffensive)
(Reblogged from lacigreen)

humansofnewyork:

“I was the youngest in the family. I went to Israel first, and the rest of the family was supposed to join me. Nobody made it. We sent letters to each other for the first few years. The last letter I got from Poland came in 1941. It was from my mother. It asked me to send food. Then the letters stopped. I knew that the Germans had occupied Poland, and I heard rumors about the things that were happening. I never learned the specifics of what happened to my family. I never wanted to.”

(Jerusalem)

(Reblogged from smartgirlsattheparty)
My brother, in almost every conversation we’ve ever had about work, he’s always said to me, “You have to be humble.” I mean, the job of a reporter is kind of omnidirectional self-abasement, right? You’re going to experts who know more than you about the thing in its kind of structural terms. You’re going to people who are being affected by it in ways that you aren’t, so they know more about how it feels and how it’s working in a way, and certainly their lives, than you do. You’re going to an editor who has a better sense than you do for story structure and how things need to be if they’re going to work. You’re going to readers who ultimately are the judge of your success. I mean it’s a funny position in that way, because you really need to be able to learn from all kinds of different people.
Ezra Klein, Editor in Chief of Vox.com in Esquire’s The Mentorship Project, a series of fifty interviews with men about the mentors who made them who they are today. (via futurejournalismproject)
(Reblogged from futurejournalismproject)
(Reblogged from gradlifethrugifs)

whiteboyslayer:

shoutout to mozzarella sticks

for real tho.

(Reblogged from tyleroakley)

(Source: sandandglass)

(Reblogged from theashleyclements)
(Reblogged from fuckyeahjamieandclaire)

(Source: myloish)

(Reblogged from wilwheaton)
(Reblogged from allaboutrings)
quietlyloud-intersex:

jopara:

thefemaletyrant:

vagabondaesthetics:

thefemaletyrant:


generalbriefing:


So….I totally never thought about this. I’m sure very few of you have. I don’t know about you, but I’m a bit disturbed…


Wow. Food for thought. I’m sure there’s an answer though.


Their names were translated/Anglicized after going from Greek to English.
The names of the Apostles are of Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew origins. The Hebrew, Aramaic and “Greek” named Apostles were:  Shim’on = Simon (Hebrew origin).  Y’hochanan = John (Hebrew origin).  Mattithyahu = Matthew (Hebrew origin).  Ya’aqov = James (Hebrew origin meaning Jacob).  Bar-Tôlmay = Bartholomew (Aramaic, which is related to Hebrew).  Judah = Jude / Saint Jude (not to be confused with Judas Iscariot, Hebrew origin).  Yehuda = Judas Iscariot (Hebrew origin, Betrayed Yeshua/Yehosua the Messiah).  Cephas / Kephas = Peter (Hebrew / Aramaic origin meaning “Rock”).  Tau’ma = Thomas (Aramaic origin).  Andrew = Andrew (Greek origin. Is the brother of Cephas / Kephas).  Phillip = Phillip (Greek origin).  You will note that there are only 11 names, that is because there were 2 Apostles named Ya’aqov (James), which brings the total to 12 apostles.
Link 

Thanks!

learning more from tumblr than college
yet again

also, “Jesus”  is really Yeshua

Also, Adam from Genesis is really not a single individual’s name. It’s “adom,” which is the Hebrew word for “man.” And “adom” comes from “adoma,” which is the soil. Eve’s name comes from either “chawah,” which means to breathe, or “chaya,” which means to live.

quietlyloud-intersex:

jopara:

thefemaletyrant:

vagabondaesthetics:

thefemaletyrant:

generalbriefing:

So….I totally never thought about this. I’m sure very few of you have. I don’t know about you, but I’m a bit disturbed…

Wow. Food for thought. I’m sure there’s an answer though.

Their names were translated/Anglicized after going from Greek to English.

The names of the Apostles are of Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew origins. The Hebrew, Aramaic and “Greek” named Apostles were:

Shim’on = Simon (Hebrew origin).

Y’hochanan = John (Hebrew origin).

Mattithyahu = Matthew (Hebrew origin).

Ya’aqov = James (Hebrew origin meaning Jacob).

Bar-Tôlmay = Bartholomew (Aramaic, which is related to Hebrew).

Judah = Jude / Saint Jude (not to be confused with Judas Iscariot, Hebrew origin).

Yehuda = Judas Iscariot (Hebrew origin, Betrayed Yeshua/Yehosua the Messiah).

Cephas / Kephas = Peter (Hebrew / Aramaic origin meaning “Rock”).

Tau’ma = Thomas (Aramaic origin).

Andrew = Andrew (Greek origin. Is the brother of Cephas / Kephas).

Phillip = Phillip (Greek origin).

You will note that there are only 11 names, that is because there were 2 Apostles named Ya’aqov (James), which brings the total to 12 apostles.

Link 

Thanks!

learning more from tumblr than college

yet again

also, “Jesus”  is really Yeshua

Also, Adam from Genesis is really not a single individual’s name. It’s “adom,” which is the Hebrew word for “man.” And “adom” comes from “adoma,” which is the soil. Eve’s name comes from either “chawah,” which means to breathe, or “chaya,” which means to live.

(Source: stfueverything)

(Reblogged from detroit-unicorn-slut)

ohnewsroom:

Copy editor: “Oh, are you going somewhere?”

Cops reporter: “Yeah, I’m going down to the river to see if there’s a body floating in it.”

Copy editor: “Before you do that, can you tell me if this headline is accurate?”

normal day in the newsroom.

(Reblogged from ohnewsroom)